The Latest

tierradentro:

“The Poet”, c.1621, Jusepe de Ribera.
Aug 2, 2014 / 128 notes

tierradentro:

The Poet”, c.1621, Jusepe de Ribera.

tierradentro:

“The Librarian”, c.1566, Giuseppe Arcimboldo.
#booksinart
Jul 30, 2014 / 103 notes

tierradentro:

The Librarian”, c.1566, Giuseppe Arcimboldo.

#booksinart




Ghent Altarpiece, detail of Mary

~Jan van Eyck

1432

Oil on Panel

11ft x 15ft (3.5m x 4.6m)
Jul 30, 2014 / 1,071 notes
Ghent Altarpiece, detail of Mary
~Jan van Eyck
1432
Oil on Panel
11ft x 15ft (3.5m x 4.6m)

(via fuckyeahrenaissanceart)

onlyoldphotography:

Jerry Schatzberg: Bob Dylan, 1965
Jul 30, 2014 / 121 notes

onlyoldphotography:

Jerry Schatzberg: Bob Dylan, 1965

1910-again:

Reliquary containing the alleged skull of Mary Magdalene, in the Basilica of Saint Mary Magdalene, Saint-Maximin-la-Sainte-Baum, France, c.1295
Another beautiful photograph, from National Geographic, can be found here.
Jul 30, 2014 / 677 notes

1910-again:

Reliquary containing the alleged skull of Mary Magdalene, in the Basilica of Saint Mary Magdalene, Saint-Maximin-la-Sainte-Baum, France, c.1295

Another beautiful photograph, from National Geographic, can be found here.

(via martyr-eater)

Jul 29, 2014 / 18,610 notes

queenerestor:

Me too, Aragorn. Me too.

(via ciastkociastko)


220 years ago today, Robespierre was executed in a coup carefully organized by his extremist colleagues. In the decades since his death, every level of malicious propaganda has been directed against him. He has been wrongly accused of dictatorship, bloodthirstiness, and intense personal repugnance which have all severely tainted his legacy within academia and popular culture. But the true Robespierre was neither tyrannical nor power crazed. He was a man of passion, a man of great personal kindness, and a man who remains my inspiration for so many more reasons than it is possible to list here. So here’s to Robespierre. I hope that my work as a historian (as well as the work of all the other passionate souls on this site!) will one day rid you of the reputation you’ve never deserved.
Jul 29, 2014 / 89 notes

220 years ago today, Robespierre was executed in a coup carefully organized by his extremist colleagues. In the decades since his death, every level of malicious propaganda has been directed against him. He has been wrongly accused of dictatorship, bloodthirstiness, and intense personal repugnance which have all severely tainted his legacy within academia and popular culture. But the true Robespierre was neither tyrannical nor power crazed. He was a man of passion, a man of great personal kindness, and a man who remains my inspiration for so many more reasons than it is possible to list here. So here’s to Robespierre. I hope that my work as a historian (as well as the work of all the other passionate souls on this site!) will one day rid you of the reputation you’ve never deserved.

(via oh-felix-yusofine)

drakontomalloi:

Pieter Bruegel the Elder - The Fall of the Rebel Angels, detail. 1562
Jul 29, 2014 / 927 notes

drakontomalloi:

Pieter Bruegel the Elder - The Fall of the Rebel Angels, detail. 1562

Jul 28, 2014 / 87 notes
Jul 27, 2014 / 138 notes

curatorialinc:

E.O. Hoppé was the “most famous photographer in the world in the 1920s.” Among his subjects were leading authors, celebrities, and people of all social stations, from royalty to commoners. One of his most explored subjects was the famous Ballet Russes, which Hoppé regularly photographed during their London seasons between 1911 and 1921. 

This world-renowned dance company challenged the traditional idea of ballets’ ‘feminine fragility’ by introducing modernism into this once sedate and highly mannered medium. Led by Sergei Diaghilev, the Ballet Russes truly embodied the concept of “Gesamtkunstwerk,” where every single aspect of the ballet—the costumes, set design, music, and choreography— were all integrated as a total work of art. Using such iconoclastic visual artists as Picasso, Matisse, Bakst and Benoit with discordant musical compositions from composers such as Stravinsky, and the dynamic and also shocking movements of their premiere dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky, the Ballet Russes forced the entire art world into the Modern Era.

(via debourbon)